Cedar Hill Artist Opens Exhibit
 
 
By RITA COOK
Focus Daily News
focuseditor@sbcglobal.net

CEDAR HILL—Local resident and artist Earline Green is currently taking part in an invitational exhibition at Mountain View College in Dallas. The exhibition is “conceptual” Green says “My quilts are conceptual, they are intended to be pretty and often conceal horrific abuse against women and children.”

By quilts, Green means the clay quilts she creates, which are her trademark and represent a number of the avenues women take in life.
 
Cedar Hill Artist opens exhibit
 
By RITA COOK
Focus Daily News
focuseditor@sbcglobal.net

CEDAR HILL—Local resident and artist Earline Green is currently taking part in an invitational exhibition at Mountain View College in Dallas. The exhibition is “conceptual” Green says “My quilts are conceptual, they are intended to be pretty and often conceal horrific abuse against women and children.”

By quilts, Green means the clay quilts she creates, which are her trademark and represent a number of the avenues women take in life.

The show Green is currently participating in until December 9 is called "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: A response by African-American Artists"

“Every fall semester here at Mountain View we chose a "Common Book" we get as many classes throughout the college using the chosen book and as many student reading it as possible,” says David Kirkland, Mountain View College Gallery Coordinator. “We also plan special events around the book. For "Henrietta Lacks" we have had lectures, discussions, film viewings, theatrical productions, this art exhibit, and the highlight a visit and discussion with Henrietta's son David Lacks and his family.”

The idea for the show originated with the college’s Common Book Committee members with Kirkland curating the show.

“I invited African-American artists from the DFW area like Earline Green, Vicki Meek, Letitia Huckaby, Girard Polite, John Spriggins, David Connolly, T. N. Vásquez, and Bernice Montgomery and from Houston Lovie Olivia, Lenard Brown, Michael K. Taylor, and Regina Agu; from Austin Wura-Natasha Ogunji and Ohio Johnny Coleman.

They each read the book and were asked to respond to it in an artwork. I gave them no other restrictions. Most of the artists had not yet read the book and so responded to it directly after reading it. These sorts of themed shows are always interesting we had one last year in our new Cliff Gallery based on "Like Water for Chocolate" and have had exhibits in the recent past based on "The Kite Runner," “Autobiography of a Face" and "The Things They Carried," but the results for this show have been exceptionally powerful and moving, both for viewers and for the artists themselves.”

Green says after reading clips of the book on the Internet she felt honored to be included along with other Texas artists.

“My process is labor intensive,” she explains. “As I read the book, I would make notes or quick sketches the next day of details that made the greatest impact.

After completing the book, I prioritized my sketches based on levels of importance to me and what I thought would be important to Henrietta. I concluded that Henrietta would have wanted her family’s history known and I wanted everyone to know that she still dwells in both her descendents and her cell line.”

The square patch in the center of Green’s art piece is Henrietta’s family tree, represented as a Nautilus Shell. The eye is Henrietta’s, but it represents her ancestral guardian from the beginning of time. Each member of her family has a chamber, Green says, and the chambers evolve chronologically. When it gets to the dates of medical breakthrough, the names of cures take their place along with her biological descendants.”

Green has been a professional artist since 1996 after receiving a Master's of Fine Arts in Ceramics from Texas Woman's University, however, she says “my journey as a quilter started 12 years ago when I was looking for a way to honor my ancestors. I often had long conversations with my grandmother Virginia Brooks Johnson about her grandmother and their love of quilts.”

Her first quilt was called Milestone of Rags, Polyester and Clay, which addressed the stories of the materials available for each generation. Since that time she has created a number additional art pieces as well as taught classes in the area.

The "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks: A response by African-American Artists" exhibit runs through Friday, December 9, 2011 at Mountain View College, 4849 West Illinois Avenue, Dallas.

 

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11/19/17